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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
. so huge. and to compare it to katrina, katrina lost more lives. we lost too many lives, but not close to katrina. but in other ways it's much more devastating than katrina. right now in new york 305,000 homes are seriously damaged or gone. kirsten showed the pictures of some of them that are just gone by fire because the water systems failed, and the wind -- then the electrical systems got shorted; fire, wind. and the, so 305,000 homes seriously damaged or gone. just in new york up to now, there are going to be more that we'll learn about because the flooding is still there in lots of the basements. these are low-lying houses. there were 214,000 total homes gone in katrina of the same level of damage. businesses, 265,000 -- this is just new york. bob will talk about, and frank talked about new jersey which has similar levels of damage. in katrina 18,000 businesses. because of the density of the population, it is a much greater economic impact on our region, of course, and on the nation. than otherwise. so despite all this pain we can't entirely fault those who came before us for build
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
. it is not katrina but we are a close second. >>shepard: any time your house is without power or full of water or on the ground you have your own private katrina. a lot of the people staying at your hotel which is not normal, they are from there. >>guest: yes, we own two hotel s in the same parking lot here so we have been here for ten years and we have opened up at the world trade center so we are used to disaster. no one realized how bad this is and on wednesday when we thought the people who are here if a couple of days would leave, we thought it would get better and it was not getting better, we called the marathon people and said we would not send our neighbors into the street and we are going to need to tell the marathon people they is to go someplace else. >>shepard: you are not the only one calling the marathon people. this is a cover of the "new york post" owned by the parent company saying abuse of power, with generators that will power tenths for the marathon folks. listen to what happened on fox business network, where we share resources. here is what happened: charlie gasparino sa
they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
that katrina could never happen here. but it has happened. and as they pump the tunnels and open the subways, iconic landmarks are twisted and broken, and still we find bodies, and revise upward the count of the dead. and now frustration and fear of the future haunt many, as homeowners scramble to salvage whatever is left and ask when the pain and suffering will stop. and to the long gaslines and impassable roads, broken infrastructure, and lost hours of work and schools add this weather alert. to those living without power in those houses comes word that the temperatures are cooling. down to the low 30s for tonight, and for the next several nights. and much worse than the cold. another nor easter, another wet and windy storm this way comes. >> and bad weather, ladies and gentlemen, the last thing the battered burrough of stat ten eileen need. let's fine out what else mother now has in store. meteorologist justin poric, what's going on? >> well, geraldo, this is the last thing that residents of in the northeast want to think about, a potential storm. this will not be sandy. will not be a big
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
, some are now drawing comparisons between this superstorm and katrina. so just how do they measure up? cnn meteorologist severe weather expert chad myers is taking a closer look. he's joining us now. how do they measure up, chad? >> well, first of all, the storm surge with katrina was enormous. almost three times more of a wave or of a surge with katrina as bay st. louis was about 28 feet. manhattan island, downtown, the battery, had about 9.5 feet. haven't seen too many numbers higher than that. 9.5 feet moving into the city comparing to moving into the bay, obviously there's a town there and all the way do biloxi, it's the population density in new york city that is going to -- and in new jersey and connecticut, that is going to put this way up in the record books. katrina, $145 billion in damage. andrew, this is cost for adjusted inflation $43.5 billion. and looks like somewhere sandy will fall somewhere between katrina and into andrew. so probably number two on the scale for dollar damage. now, when it comes to deaths, it's disturbing, wolf, to see and hear how quickly the fatalit
all of this living through this for a second time is proof of how katrina changed the nation's psychology when it comes to storms. >> yes. >> how many lessons have been learned, dark days along the gulf coast in '05. see it playing out. closest thing to katrina since '05. you are seeing the country changed after the storm, even response on every level has changed as well. interesting to watch, yet again for sure. >> yeah. >> coming up next, images are almost too much for adults to comprehend. for children, the pictures from sandy could be downright heartbreaking and confusing. >> we'll show you what one familiar fuzzy face is doing to help them understand. ♪ we have all been assaulted by the sights and sound of hurricane sandy. they can be hard for an adult but overwhelming for a child. >> imagine what it is like for kids. gma anchor josh elliott has this story. >> reporter: we adults called it a super storm. amidst the ferocity of nature's wrath, it was just plain scary. how do you talk to kids about getting through the storm of the century. we got together with a panel of
oceanic and not mr. association, the costliest storms to hit katrina by one at funk shot. take, about 30 billion. andrew in 90 to about 36.5 billion. wilma in 2005, i've been 18 billion, charlie indo for 15 billion, reader, frances and jeanne all and hurricane damage. in your view, does the national flood insurance program currently structured work? >> i think it does work. it does help protect consumers from an uninsurable event in the private arcade. the program was created in 1968 was the result created because the private market could not accurately and in suitably underrate the insurance risk. so what was happening was people were completely without flood insurance protection. so is happening in the 60s and 50s as american citizens were being flooded and the only recourse that she had was federal disaster assistance after the fact. so the program was created to have people pay into a program and be prepared for storm and a flood event before it happened. now, it certainly could use improvement. you know, there are critics out there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal gove
thing about katrina it happens in new orleans during the summer, is it wasn't cold. but the devastation along the coast line is similar. just without the flooding. the water just stayed there. in katrina the traditional hugertraditionalhurricane damage was not the problem. it was that the floodwaters stayed. >> eliot: the lack of fundamental energies, heat food the devastation the public is getting equally upset in terms of the frustration levels. >> i don't think the people people--rockaway is the peninsula which is have very interesting point because it starts at breezy point, and then it goes down to the far rock rockaway. so you've got this racial ethnic kind of kaleidoscope there. but then you have everybody in the same boat because anybody has any power or water. no hot water. and it's just--it mounts up. it's like a geometric progression. if you don't have heat and hot water for four days. that's in the so bad. but every day that you go through it, and now it's almost been three weeks it becomes more and more horrific. >> eliot: erroll, the anxiety level is growing and it grows d
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
here. the same group that went to the gulf coast following hurricane katrina. the navy is bringing in pumps that they normally use on ships. i want it draw attention to the building behind me. it is staten island ferry entrance. currently all services are suspended indefinitely. the police tape is up by the battery park underpass. because as you can see 50 feet of water is still there. limited subway service began before 6:00 today. mta says 5.5 million people daily right on their subways. they also say any day that their trains are not running it costs them $18 million in revenue. traffic has been a mess throughout the city because of lack of people not being able to use public transportation and road closures. they're making three occupants or more are in each vehicle if they're going over the four east river bridges. they won't get a ticket but they won't let people through if they don't have three people in there. also the area around where the crane collapsed in midtown is still frozen. we heard from the mayor bloomberg and he is saying that that is going to be weekend before
government has stepped in to help. this is the third hurricane i've covered in my lifetime, andrew, katrina and now this. we are at the point where the population gets furious and they turn on the government. the government can just not handle the huge, huge logistical requirements that happen after a storm like this. could this actually turn on the president at some point here? >> reporter: i don't think so. i think what the president has had the opportunity to do is show americans that he was involved in an effort that the country was rallying behind and do his job in a way that got praise by the keynote speaker at the republican convention, chris christie, very tough critic of the president otherwise. so i don't think many voters are going to blame president obama for what's going on right now, and leave aside the fact that the states in which the difficulties are occurring db new york, new jersey, connecticut are all reliantly democratic states. what is much more important to the outcome of this election, michelle, is what's going on behind me at this afl-cio phone bank where union volu
that katrina because they spent it on massage parlors and everything you can think of in addition to what was necessary. >> jennifer: that's iowa tea party congressman and crazytown resident steve king. he's one of 11 congressional members who days after hurricane katrina voted against $51.8 billion in relief spending in louisiana and mississippi. and now, just days after hurricane sandy he obviously has not changed his tune. and it is that kind of radical radical/insane thinking that's gotten him into his tightest re-election race yet. the latest ppp poll has him running three points ahead of his democratic opponent, christie vilsack. 48% to 45% in iowa. congressman king is not alone. several of his fellow representatives from tea party crazytown are in the political fights of their lives as well. begin with minnesota congresswoman michele bachmann. she's off the charts in name recognition. she raised $18 million more than her democratic opponent jim graves. her district has an 8% republican registration edge but still sh
call that had to be made in new orleans after katrina with mardi gras. >> huge debate. the difference was -- the storm in august. mardi gras was in february. months between. now days between. >> i know. >> i don't know. i don't know. a tough call here. it is going to go on. the mayor said it is. those of you coming into the city to do it. run hard. run well. we'll be back with more after this. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now." informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> this morning on "world news now," a presidential promise of help in the heart of the hurricane devastation. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie stood side by side as they toured the destruction and talks with the victims of sandy. it's thursday, november 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good thursday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> always good to have you as the co-pilot here. >> so good to be here. >> there's power here and there's heat which is good. >> yes. both of which i do not have at home. >> soldiering through. welcome b
. do you think they would have run the new orleans marathon the week of katrina? >> right. i don't think so. >> steve: of course not. >> gretchen: rest of the headlines for saturday. president obama ordering the military to send extra gallons of fuel to new york and in the wake of seand. gas shortages unless people panicked. gas will be rationed starting at noon people with license plates ending in odd number will only be able to buy gas. cars with license plates ending in even number can fill up on even numbered days. four ohio men busted for stealing mitt romney campaign signs. some were found in a union truck. police found tools that could be used to take signs down. local campaign workers have had problems with signs being stolen. this the is first time someone has been caught. the men were arrested and face misdemeanor charges. people in parts ofism know are going to have to pony up extra money if they want to buy a gun now. cook county, which includes chicago, has approved a tax that charges people 2 a dollars for every gun that they buy. well, the move is expected to raise
sense as well? >> katrina? yes. i know how those people in katrina feel. i really do. my heart went out to them. but until you go through something like this, you cannot understand the magnitude of this. my friends have come to help me. they said, michelle, we looked at your yard because we have all the stuff in the yard. they said, michelle, if we didn't see this with our own eyes, we would never believe it. >> and it's hard to know when power will be restored. mayor bloomberg said the ferry service will resume in the next day or so. he says full service by saturday, the ferry from staten island over to manhattan, new york. but who knows what's going to happen. >> i don't know. >> our heart goes out to you and your family. >> thank you so much. i'm a big fan of yours, wolf. it's a pleasure to speak with you. you know, i have to put it in perspective. we have our lives and i have my children. and, you know, it's just stuff like my kids say. but when i find my son's baby book, it rips at your heart strings. but i'm grateful that we're here. >> yeah. and i like your attitude. you got to t
. but things have changed, haven't they? >> the whole story really is the cold katrina that is going on up there in parts of new york and part was new jersey as you just reported. i think this has gone way beyond a happy chappy political photoop event and has become something terbelieve for a lot of people. it is almost for a moment outside of the realm of politics as they suffer through. >> i was staggered to see a poll yesterday on the david gregory show said 65 percent of the country approved the president's handlingly the storm. have a talked to the people it is impossible for me to see how someone gets high grades because they put on a jeans jacket and walk through the rubble. >> it was early on in the days of the storm, it looked like government was in control and the president was there walking around new jersey. but very quickly, this turned into a story whose headline in time government didn't work so well, didn't it? they didn't get in the water or blankets and they ran out of the gas and as for the electrical situation, it is not a katrina where it is warm outside. people are co
katrina and 9/11. this is actually a company that charles has talked about before. take a look at how the dollar is faring today. ♪ from local communities to local businesses. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to a currency market for everyone. the potential of fxcm unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. >> 22 minutes past the hour. i am jamie colby with your fox news minute. some subways are rolling again. none of them are going into lower manhattan which is still without power. long lines to get a shuttle bus into the city. they carry more than 5 million people a day. the commuter railroads are providing service. in the meantime, all fares are waived through midnight tomorrow night. all three new york airports are back in service. even on a limited basis. laguardia was the last to come back online due to flooding. everyone should confirm flights before heading to the airport. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail. after three days focusing on the federal response to the storm, the president w
following a critical disaster. he got the port of new orleans up and running after hurricane katrina in 2005. gary lagrange joins us now from new orleans. welcome to the program. it is good to see you here. if the port of new york were to make a call to you and say, look, gary, you've done this before, what should we do? what would you say to them? >> well, first, i think the port of new york, new jersey is in great hands. admiral rick larabie has weathered the storm many times before. the communications aspect is first and foremost about anything. the pilots, noaa, coast guard, army corp of engineers, all staying in touch with each other to ensure that the port and the harbor can open just as quickly as possible to assure that the safeguard and movement of commerce is first safe, but also expeditious as well. because of the magnitude of a port like new york, new jersey, just is an absolute must. a huge market area. many consumers relying on it. >> more broadly, ceos who are obviously attempting to hold businesses together and ensure that they function, many of them in a very, very difficult
government. really it is only borrowing the money. that's what they did in katrina. they borrowed up to $20 billion. they blew through 18 billion in katrina. they have 3 billion left and 2.9 billion left. that will go through so quickly in new york and new jersey we're running up to a he had did line here. melissa: when i hear them say they will run out of money does it make a difference? it is your money, my money our audience's money. it is taxpayer dollars. what difference does it make whether it comes from congress or fema? it must matter. >> it almost what fema is doing, microcosm what the federal government does. it prints it and goes into more deficit spending. that is what fema is doing. they don't have the money. they will not be able to pay back 18 billion they already owe. it is kind of fungible. it is all really the system but congress needs to address this. we can't keep on doing this. we can't keep on bailing out fema and saying everything will be fine. we'll plug a hole here or there. melissa: we don't want to leave people who need help. >> no. melissa: are they out of money
katrina tainted george bush's presidency. then isaac wiped out the first day of the republican national convention. now hurricane sandy. sandy, what kind of name is that? are you induced or a lady storm? big surprise, just when obama needs a boost, who shows up in a gender ambiguous weather system? a category 5 bi-hurricane. don't get me wrong, i don't mind you being a meteorological event but why must be so flam poiboya and in my face about it? no, i'm hurricane sandy. deal with me. >> all right. did you see this video yesterday? a 4-year-old girl in ft. collins, colorado, if you think you're sick of the presidential election, look to her reaction after a ride to her grocery store with her mom during which she listened to an mpr report about the campaign. >> because i'm tired of both obama and mitt romney. >> that's why you're crying? oh, it will be over soon, abby. okay? the election will be over soon, okay? >> okay. >> she speaks for so many. by the way, npr offered an apology to the little girl and said "only a few more days. only a few more days." here's a picture of little abigail
health there. you and i have talked a lot about hospitals in the wake of katrina. why do people put the power in the basement? it seems to me the first thing that's going to go in a flood or any kind of, not even a major a storm, but a minor storm, is your basement's going to flood. >> this has been a bit of a technological whack-a-mole here, because we realized after katrina, and even after the blackout of 2003, we had to do something about backup generators in hospital. and so we moved the generators upstairs, but left the fuel pumps down in the basement. so we fixed the initial problem and have a secondary that no one seems to have thought about. >> okay, is that just complete stupidity, or is that, listen, it's financially expensive and people make the gamble, we're not going to invest the money and hope for the best. >> i think in this case, it was not paying attention to all of the details. i think people were well meaning. i don't think there was any sort of gross negligence here, except that somebody forgot an essential detail, in a situation that requires extraordinarily ex
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)